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New members must first INTRODUCE THEMSELVES in the introduce yourself thread below if they want to post replies and start threads. If more than a couple of days have past after posting on the introduce yourself thread, and you still can't start threads, pm me. Either I've been away, or I have overlooked your introduction and forgotten to add you to the approved list.

Introduce yourself so you can be approved to post comments

If you want to post comments and start threads, first tell us how you came about concave Earth. Do you think the Earth is concave? What are your views on media fakery and false flags.

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maynard
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Re: Introduce yourself so you can be approved to post comments

Postby maynard » Wed Jan 11, 2017 3:06 pm

1. I was wondering for many years about the 'high horizon' at the ocean and other things, read a lot of the flat earth theories but was turned off by many things. Gave 'Inner Earth' a probability, but never made 'click' that WE are in the concave part of it until recently. Good stuff here, lots of pioneer work.. thank you, HW... found it thru Google 'concave Earth'

2. I see a very high percentage of 'terrorist attacks' as false flags and whatever 'real' ones immediately used for an agenda to enslave mankind even further. Looking for ways to survive these efforts. I study a lot the subject of energy bodies to that extent, looking at Castaneda's claims, and the stuff at http://energy-bodies.org/ and similar things.

I have a puzzling question I wanted to ask, that's why I joined the forum: it appears to me (subjectively) that the horizon seems higher at some place on Earth than on others. For example, the horizon of the Atlantic in Northern Brazil seems higher (scaringly, actually) than in the middle or South of Brazil, the Pacific at the US West Coast seems much lower than that, and much lower yet, the Atlantic as seen from Europe. I confirmed this with a couple of people but most everyone never pays attention. I shook up a good friend of mine just some time ago; I told her about that while she was at the beach at the Copacabana prior to a flight to Recife (in the North) where she arrived in the later afternoon and went straight to the beach and found the horizon shockingly higher than what she had seen just a few hours before. (Now she's kind of claustrophobic and blames it on me, oh well).

One explanation would be that the glass sphere has a dent (assuming that the glass ceiling limits the horizon vision). But if it is rotating, it should affect other parts and not always the same area. Note that the weather at Northern Brazil's coast is nearly always constant throughout the year, some areas like Praia de Forte have 27 degrees Celsius (if I remember right) plus minus 2 degrees only, an extremely constant clima.

So much for now, thanks for listening!


SusanBrown
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Re: Introduce yourself so you can be approved to post comments

Postby SusanBrown » Thu Jan 12, 2017 4:36 am

Hey,
glad to be a part of this forum. I am very happy to find a group of people who have the same interest as mine.

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Wild Heretic
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Re: Introduce yourself so you can be approved to post comments

Postby Wild Heretic » Mon Jan 16, 2017 1:14 pm

maynard wrote:
I have a puzzling question I wanted to ask, that's why I joined the forum: it appears to me (subjectively) that the horizon seems higher at some place on Earth than on others. For example, the horizon of the Atlantic in Northern Brazil seems higher (scaringly, actually) than in the middle or South of Brazil, the Pacific at the US West Coast seems much lower than that, and much lower yet, the Atlantic as seen from Europe. I confirmed this with a couple of people but most everyone never pays attention. I shook up a good friend of mine just some time ago; I told her about that while she was at the beach at the Copacabana prior to a flight to Recife (in the North) where she arrived in the later afternoon and went straight to the beach and found the horizon shockingly higher than what she had seen just a few hours before. (Now she's kind of claustrophobic and blames it on me, oh well).


That is very interesting. You are basically saying that the horizon looks higher the further south you go, right? Assuming your observations really does mean that the horizon really is higher further south if someone were to measure it, then a couple of possibilities spring to mind. The first question I would ask is, is this a seasonal observation? In other words is this linked to the moon/sun rotation, i.e. a tidal issue? Is the Brazilian horizon always higher than the Californian one throughout the year if your friend got on a plane say four times a year and saw the Brazilian hoizon was higher each time? I would assume this would be the case, so I am less inclined that the moon/sun is causing this.

If this observaton is constant, then it sounds like a magnetic hemisphere thing. The magnetic north pole (hole?) (geographic south) is very slightly stronger than the magnetic south pole (geographic north) according to my model due to the sun staying longer closer to the magnetic south pole over the winter solstice before it turns back down due to Lenz's law (the sun spends more days at the sun's lowest angle over the winter solstice than the sun's highest angle during the summer one). This might make the earth cavity very slightly pear shaped. It seems there may be some truth in the pear shape:

A second theory, more complicated than triaxiality, proposed that observed long periodic orbital variations of the first Earth satellites indicate an additional depression at the south pole accompanied by a bulge of the same degree at the north pole. It is also contended that the northern middle latitudes were slightly flattened and the southern middle latitudes bulged in a similar amount. This concept suggested a slightly pear-shaped Earth and was the subject of much public discussion.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Figure_of_the_Earth

How this concept makes the horizon higher in the southern hemisphere, or least the middle southern hemisphere, I have no idea; but this is the area I would look into.

Edit: I've just realised that the more flattened northern latitudes mean a very slightly reduced area of space in that part of the cavity. If you think of a pear, there is less space in the narrow top part than the wide bottom. This means more pressure from gravity (whatever causes that) which means that the water levels (horizon) will be lower in the north than in the south.

There you go. That is my intial possible explanation.
"When you have eliminated all which is impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."

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Re: Introduce yourself so you can be approved to post comments

Postby Wild Heretic » Mon Jan 16, 2017 1:20 pm

SusanBrown wrote:Hey,
glad to be a part of this forum. I am very happy to find a group of people who have the same interest as mine.


What part of the forum do you find interesting?
"When you have eliminated all which is impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."

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maynard
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Re: Introduce yourself so you can be approved to post comments

Postby maynard » Tue Jan 17, 2017 4:44 pm

Wild Heretic wrote:That is very interesting. You are basically saying that the horizon looks higher the further south you go, right?


Perhaps the added height correlates mostly to the proximity to the equator and only to a lesser degree to how South the location is. I observed it only in the locations I mentioned. Will keep my eyes open, literally, during my next trips, also Argentina etc.

An additional reflection: it may relate also to the clima differences between Southern and Northern Hemisphere. I always distrusted the conventional explanations.

I have not found much on this board on the subject of "continental drift"; For me it is very clear that the Earth shell is expanding. There is nothing drifting around. The circumstance that areas like Nevada/Death Valley have been sea beds and are now below sea level is a further indication that the Earth is concave, if you take the two observations together. Adams' animation should be updated/modified to reflec this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_8n7s3QpqY

Yet another consideration would be the data on the size of animal and pre-human bodies (the latter made secret). The body sizes seem to depend on the ambient athmospheric pressure (lots of evidence pointing to that supposedly). This means for an expanding Earth that the airpressure may have go down because of a larger space available for the concavity and would explain lower pressure which in turn results in smaller bodies.

Some thoughts... I don't know yet how to distribute those ideas onto the various forum topics ;)

Thank you for approving my membership :) !!
MdM

maynard wrote:I have a puzzling question I wanted to ask, that's why I joined the forum: it appears to me (subjectively) that the horizon seems higher at some place on Earth than on others. For example, the horizon of the Atlantic in Northern Brazil seems higher (scaringly, actually) than in the middle or South of Brazil, the Pacific at the US West Coast seems much lower than that, and much lower yet, the Atlantic as seen from Europe. I confirmed this with a couple of people but most everyone never pays attention. I shook up a good friend of mine just some time ago; I told her about that while she was at the beach at the Copacabana prior to a flight to Recife (in the North) where she arrived in the later afternoon and went straight to the beach and found the horizon shockingly higher than what she had seen just a few hours before. (Now she's kind of claustrophobic and blames it on me, oh well).


Wild Heretic wrote:That is very interesting. You are basically saying that the horizon looks higher the further south you go, right? Assuming your observations really does mean that the horizon really is higher further south if someone were to measure it, then a couple of possibilities spring to mind. The first question I would ask is, is this a seasonal observation? In other words is this linked to the moon/sun rotation, i.e. a tidal issue? Is the Brazilian horizon always higher than the Californian one throughout the year if your friend got on a plane say four times a year and saw the Brazilian hoizon was higher each time? I would assume this would be the case, so I am less inclined that the moon/sun is causing this.

If this observaton is constant, then it sounds like a magnetic hemisphere thing. The magnetic north pole (hole?) (geographic south) is very slightly stronger than the magnetic south pole (geographic north) according to my model due to the sun staying longer closer to the magnetic south pole over the winter solstice before it turns back down due to Lenz's law (the sun spends more days at the sun's lowest angle over the winter solstice than the sun's highest angle during the summer one). This might make the earth cavity very slightly pear shaped. It seems there may be some truth in the pear shape:

A second theory, more complicated than triaxiality, proposed that observed long periodic orbital variations of the first Earth satellites indicate an additional depression at the south pole accompanied by a bulge of the same degree at the north pole. It is also contended that the northern middle latitudes were slightly flattened and the southern middle latitudes bulged in a similar amount. This concept suggested a slightly pear-shaped Earth and was the subject of much public discussion.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Figure_of_the_Earth

How this concept makes the horizon higher in the southern hemisphere, or least the middle southern hemisphere, I have no idea; but this is the area I would look into.

Edit: I've just realised that the more flattened northern latitudes mean a very slightly reduced area of space in that part of the cavity. If you think of a pear, there is less space in the narrow top part than the wide bottom. This means more pressure from gravity (whatever causes that) which means that the water levels (horizon) will be lower in the north than in the south.

There you go. That is my intial possible explanation.


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